The Listener

You in Action:
You analyze your thoughts before you speak. This gives you
the ability to articulate in great depth how you feel.
Therefore, when you speak, others listen.

You can be impulsive. This is especially true if you drink alcohol.
All of a sudden you could be doing something you never
imagined you’d do. This behavior sometimes results in stories
about you that you would not divulge to anyone. Your impulsive
actions are manifestations of suppressed feelings and desires.
You are the confidant. Others trust you with their
greatest secrets. You attentive listening makes them feel important
to you. In fact, many times you hear more than you want to hear.

When someone is telling you something that makes you feel
uncomfortable, your face doesn’t show a negative expression,
even though you’re thinking, “Help! Why are you
telling me this?” Therefore, they keep on talking. You hear
details and stories that make soap operas sound boring.

At work, you occasionally forget to define what activities
need to be done. This can make you a poor manager. Be
firm. State each task, duty, or expectation in detail so that
your coworkers know specifically what you want. Write
things down, then follow up.

Go There:
When you don’t initially speak up, others might see
you as wimpy, weak, or politically neutral. Simply tell them,
without emotion, “I need to think about this in-depth. I’ll
get back to you. ”They will then see that you have the tactical
skills to say the appropriate things at the right time. This
discovery will increase their respect for you.